Training

Training Resources

National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers

The mission of the NACDL is to ensure justice and due process for persons accused of crime; foster the integrity, independence and expertise of the criminal defense profession; and promote the proper and fair administration of criminal justice.

Vermont Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers

The Vermont Association of Criminal Defense Layers is a group comprised of attorneys admitted to practice law in Vermont who are actively engaged in the defense of criminal cases.

Vermont Bar Association

The Vermont Bar Association values the rule of las as the cornerstone of a democratic society; equal access to justice; a collegial legal community whose members are respected and honest; competence, diligence; an informed and wise reformation of the law; and the special role of the lawyer as a public servant.

November 2017 Federal Criminal Defense Seminar

Agenda & PowerPoint Presentations

BOP Designation and Policies

 


DSO Training Events

Train the Trainers Workshop

Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Date: October 18 - 20, 2018

The Train the Trainers (TTT) Workshop is designed to enhance training skills and expand the pool of experienced legal professionals available to serve as faculty at local legal education programs designed for CJA panel attorneys and federal defender staff, as well as national Defender Services Office, Training Division (DSO-TD) events. Participants will learn, discuss, and apply principles of adult learning, effective training design, small group facilitation skills, and persuasive presentation techniques and methodologies. The workshop is open to CJA Attorneys, federal defender staff (Assistant Federal Defenders, Research and Writing Specialists, Computer Systems Administrators, Paralegals, and Investigators) and others who provide services under the CJA. All participants must bring a laptop loaded with presentation software to the workshop. Prior to the beginning of the program, each participant is required to provide an outline of a presentation. Registration is limited to a total of 40 people. Limited financial assistance may be available to non-federal defender registrants for travel expenses.

WEBINAR: DIMAYA PART 4: ANALYZING DIMAYA’S IMPACT ON IMMIGRATION CASES

Date: August 28, 2018

Mr. Dimaya was a lawful permanent resident, who pled guilty to residential burglary, and an Immigration Judge determined that his convictions were "crime[s] of violence" under 18 U.S.C. SS 16 (b), thus making him removable from the United States under the Immigration and Nationality Act.  The Supreme Court held that 16(b) was unconstitutionally vague.  What does this decision mean for other noncitizen defendants facing criminal and non-criminal grounds of removal? What about those who are charged with illegal reentry based on a crime of violence conviction?  In this 4th part of the Dimaya webinar series, we will discuss the immigration implications of Dimaya, review recent circuit court and Board of Immigration appeals cases, and provide strategies for defending noncitizens against criminal prosecutions in light of this and other recent Supreme Court decisions.

WEBINAR: DIMAYA PART 4: ANALYZING DIMAYA’S IMPACT ON IMMIGRATION CASES (LIVE REPEAT)

Date: August 30, 2018

Mr. Dimaya was a lawful permanent resident, who pled guilty to residential burglary, and an Immigration Judge determined that his convictions were “crime[s] of violence” under 18 U.S.C. § 16 (b), thus making him removable from the United States under the Immigration and Nationality Act. The Supreme Court held that 16(b) was unconstitutionally vague. What does this decision mean for other noncitizen defendants facing criminal and non-criminal grounds of removal? What about those who are charged with illegal reentry based on a crime of violence conviction? In this 4th part of the Dimaya webinar series, we will discuss the immigration implications of Dimaya, review recent circuit court and Board of Immigration appeals cases, and provide strategies for defending noncitizens against criminal prosecutions in light of this and other recent Supreme Court decisions.

WEBINAR: DIMAYA PART 3: POSTCONVICTION REMEDIES INVOLVING SESSIONS V. DIMAYA AND OTHER CHALLENGES TO PREDICATE OFFENSES BEYOND DIMAYA

Date: July 24, 2018

On April 17, 2018, the Supreme Court decided Sessions v. Dimaya, 138 S. Ct. 1204 (2018), striking down the federal definition of "crime of violence” in 18 U.S.C. § 16 as unconstitutionally vague. The Court had done something similar in Johnson v. United States, 135 S. Ct. 2551 (2015), holding the similarly worded residual clause in the “violent felony” definition of the Armed Career Criminal Act to be void for vagueness.

The potential impact of Dimaya on federal criminal statutes, including 18 U.S.C. § 924(c), was explored in Part 2 of our Dimaya webinar series.  While Part 2 focused on federal prisoners whose convictions have not yet become final, this Part 3 installment of our 4-part series will take up where Part 2 left off by addressing two distinct issues: (1) how to use Dimaya to challenge convictions that have become final—28 U.S.C. § 2255; and (2) other challenges to predicate offenses beyond Dimaya. 

Like Part 2, this webinar is targeted to practitioners with a working knowledge of the categorical and modified categorical approaches (which was covered in Part 1), a familiarity with the Supreme Court’s related holding in Johnson, and a basic understanding of the “crime of violence” definitions in 18 U.S.C. § 16 and 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(3).  This webinar also assumes participants have viewed and are familiar with the matters explored in Part 2 of the Dimaya webinar series.

WEBINAR: DIMAYA PART 3: POSTCONVICTION REMEDIES INVOLVING SESSIONS V. DIMAYA AND OTHER CHALLENGES TO PREDICATE OFFENSES BEYOND DIMAYA

Date: July 26, 2018

On April 17, 2018, the Supreme Court decided Sessions v. Dimaya, 138 S. Ct. 1204 (2018), striking down the federal definition of "crime of violence” in 18 U.S.C. § 16 as unconstitutionally vague. The Court had done something similar in Johnson v. United States, 135 S. Ct. 2551 (2015), holding the similarly worded residual clause in the “violent felony” definition of the Armed Career Criminal Act to be void for vagueness.

The potential impact of Dimaya on federal criminal statutes, including 18 U.S.C. § 924(c), was explored in Part 2 of our Dimaya webinar series.  While Part 2 focused on federal prisoners whose convictions have not yet become final, this Part 3 installment of our 4-part series will take up where Part 2 left off by addressing two distinct issues: (1) how to use Dimaya to challenge convictions that have become final—28 U.S.C. § 2255; and (2) other challenges to predicate offenses beyond Dimaya

Like Part 2, this webinar is targeted to practitioners with a working knowledge of the categorical and modified categorical approaches (which was covered in Part 1), a familiarity with the Supreme Court’s related holding in Johnson, and a basic understanding of the “crime of violence” definitions in 18 U.S.C. § 16 and 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(3).  This webinar also assumes participants have viewed and are familiar with the matters explored in Part 2 of the Dimaya webinar series.

This is a repeat of 10am webinar on July 24th 2018.

Non-Capital Habeas Conference

Location: New Orleans, Louisiana
Date: September 27 - 28, 2018

The program will cover the broad spectrum of issues specific to habeas corpus litigation on behalf of prisoners with non-capital cases.  Plenary sessions will feature both national speakers and seasoned non-capital habeas attorneys, and all breakout sessions include an option for the advanced or the beginner habeas practitioner.  Sessions will include investigating and pleading claims, habeas case updates from the circuits, and an ethics session about how to handle ineffective assistance of counsel claims.  Anticipated beginner track topics include introductions to timeliness, claim exhaustion, and procedural default.   Anticipated advanced track topics include the interplay between 28 U.S.C. § 2254(d)(2) and (e)(1) and a real-case brainstorm session.  There will be a keynote address by The Honorable Jeffrey S. Sutton, Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, about the interplay between the state and federal courts.

Orientation Seminar for Assistant Federal Defenders

Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico
Date: November 05 - 09, 2018

This seminar for new assistant federal defenders includes a mix of topics on substantive federal criminal law, sentencing, trial tactics, evidence, and ethics.  Most topics are presented in plenary lectures while some are offered in breakout sessions.

For more information regarding this program, including registration materials, please contact Chuck Arberg at the Federal Judicial Center at (202) 502-4050 or e-mail him at carberg@fjc.gov. The agenda and materials will be posted at the Federal Judicial Center's intranet page

Appellate Writing Workshop For Federal Defenders

Location: Washington, District of Columbia
Date: September 05 - 07, 2018

Through a mix of lectures and small group exercises, this program provides in-depth instruction in legal writing. Each participant writes a brief in advance of the program using a provided sample case file. Past audiences have included a mix of appellate specialists and attorneys who handle both trials and appeals. All have found the program very valuable.  Because of the program's emphasis on small group workshops and in-depth individualized instruction, attendance is limited.

The program is open to Federal Defenders and CJA Panel Attorneys.

For more information regarding this program, including registration information, contact Chuck Arberg at the Federal Judicial Center at (202) 502-4050 or email him at carberg@fjc.gov. The agenda and materials will be posted on the Federal Judicial Center's intranet page.

Law & Technology Series: Electronic Courtroom Presentation

Location: Long Beach, CA
Date: August 02 - 04, 2018

The Law & Technology Series: Electronic Courtroom Presentation Workshop (ECP) exposes CJA panel and federal public/community defender attorneys and professional staff to the legal, strategic, and technological considerations involved with electronically presenting information in the federal courtroom during trial and hearings. This two-and-a-half-day program uses a combination of plenary presentations and small group, hands-on instruction. In the smaller breakout groups, attendees will practice direct and cross-examination, opening statements, and closing arguments, using Trial Director and PowerPoint software which are well suited for electronically presenting information in the courtroom.

To best participate at this program, all attendees are required to provide their own laptop computer and strongly encouraged to bring their own case materials (hearing/trial, small/large). In order to be considered for admission, all applicants are required to fill-out and submit a short skill set survey before their registration request is completed. NOTE: The litigation support software programs used in this workshop are designed to work on Windows operating systems (as opposed to Mac). If accepted, you must bring a laptop running Windows, or a Mac laptop running a virtualized copy of Windows.

Webinar: Dimaya Part 2: Beyond The Residual Clause: Challenging Your Client’s “Crime Of Violence” Under Sessions v. Dimaya (LIVE REPEAT)

Date: June 28, 2018

On April 17, 2018, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Sessions v. Dimaya, 138 S. Ct. 1204 (2018), holding that the residual clause of 18 U.S.C. SS 16's definition of "crime of violence" is unconstitutionally vague. Having deja vu? You're not alone. In striking SS 16's residual clause, Dimaya relied on a "straightforward application" of its 2015 decision in Johnson v. United States, 135 S. Ct. 2551 (2015). In Johnson, the Supreme Court deemed a similar residual clause in the "violent felony" definition of the Armed Career Criminal Act to be void for vagueness.

So, how does Dimaya affect your clients? In this webinar, we will explore the impact of Dimaya on federal criminal statutes, and particularly its applicability to 18 U.S.C. SS 924(c). We will identify the many reasons why Dimaya should apply to SS 924(c) cases and provide you with the responses needed to refute the government's contrary position. You will also learn how to challenge your client's predicate conviction under the remaining portion of the "crime of violence" definition - the force clause. Finally, the webinar will address how to overcome procedural obstacles, such as a defendant's appellate waiver, on direct review.

This webinar is targeted to practitioners with a working knowledge of the categorical and modified categorical approaches, a familiarity with the Supreme Court's related holding in Johnson v. United States, and a basic understanding of the "crime of violence" definitions in 18 U.S.C. SS 16 and 18 U.S.C. SS 924(c)(3).