Upcoming DSO Training Events


Date: June 30, 2021

Palomar-Santiago, the Supreme Court addressed collateral challenges to underlying removal orders in illegal reentry prosecutions for the first time since Mendoza-Lopez, the watershed decision it issued 34 years ago. But did Palomar-Santiago gut our precedent, open up new arguments, or some of both? This webinar will discuss the procedural history and holding ofPalomar-Santiago, the negative effects it could have in some circuits, and creative strategies for using it to expand our litigation options in other circuits.

Presenters:

Joseph Camden is an Assistant Federal Public Defender in the Richmond office of the Eastern District of Virginia. Before coming to Richmond in 2017, he spent seven years as a trial attorney at Federal Defenders of San Diego, Inc., where he focused on litigating illegal reentry cases and categorical approach issues. And before that, he spent a couple years teaching English in Siberia. He is available for advice or to share briefing on categorical approach issues any time.

Kara Hartzler is an appellate attorney at the Federal Defenders of San Diego, Inc. Prior to joining the Federal Defenders, she served as the Legal Director and Criminal Immigration Consultant at the Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project in Arizona, where she specialized in the immigration consequences of criminal convictions. She has authored numerous books, articles, and resources for defense attorneys, including Surviving Padilla:  A Defender’s Guide to Advising Noncitizens on the Immigration Consequences of Criminal Convictions. Kara also served as an adjunct professor at the University of Arizona College of Law and testified in front of the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Immigration on the detention and deportation of citizens and other due process violations in the immigration system. She is the recipient of the 2018 E. Stanley Conant Award, the 2017 Outstanding Assistant Federal Defender award, the 2013 David Carliner Public Interest Award, the 2013 Randy Tunac Courage in Immigration Award, and the 2010 Robert J. Hooker Award for service to the defender community.

The Training Division is not applying for CLE for this webinar.


Date: July 21, 2021

This session provides an update on recent Supreme Court decisions affecting federal criminal practice and reviews issues currently under consideration, as well as possible issues for the future.

Presenter:

Jeffrey Fisher is a professor at Stanford Law School and co-director of its Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. He is also special counsel at O’Melveny & Myers LLP. His academic and Supreme Court work runs the gamut of federal constitutional and statutory matters, with an emphasis on criminal procedure issues.

Professor Fisher has argued over forty cases in the Supreme Court. Among his successes are Riley v. California and Carpenter v. United States, involving the Fourth Amendment’s application to digital information, and Crawford v. Washington and Melendez-Diaz v. Massachusetts, involving the Confrontation Clause. Professor Fisher was also co-counsel for the plaintiffs in Obergefell v. Hodges, in which the Court held that the Fourteenth Amendment guarantees same-sex couples a right to marry. In 2006, the National Law Journal named him one of the 100 most influential lawyers in the country – the youngest person on the list – and he has remained on that list ever since.

Professor Fisher formerly served as a law clerk to Justice John Paul Stevens on the Supreme Court of the United States and to Judge Stephen Reinhardt on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He also is a recipient of the Heeney Award, the highest honor bestowed by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.


Date: July 21, 2021

This session provides an update on recent Supreme Court decisions affecting federal criminal practice and reviews issues currently under consideration, as well as possible issues for the future.

Presenter:

Jeffrey Fisher is a professor at Stanford Law School and co-director of its Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. He is also special counsel at O’Melveny & Myers LLP. His academic and Supreme Court work runs the gamut of federal constitutional and statutory matters, with an emphasis on criminal procedure issues.

Professor Fisher has argued over forty cases in the Supreme Court. Among his successes are Riley v. California and Carpenter v. United States, involving the Fourth Amendment’s application to digital information, and Crawford v. Washington and Melendez-Diaz v. Massachusetts, involving the Confrontation Clause. Professor Fisher was also co-counsel for the plaintiffs in Obergefell v. Hodges, in which the Court held that the Fourteenth Amendment guarantees same-sex couples a right to marry. In 2006, the National Law Journal named him one of the 100 most influential lawyers in the country – the youngest person on the list – and he has remained on that list ever since.

Professor Fisher formerly served as a law clerk to Justice John Paul Stevens on the Supreme Court of the United States and to Judge Stephen Reinhardt on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He also is a recipient of the Heeney Award, the highest honor bestowed by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.


Date: July 01 - August 31, 2021

This presentation was recorded during a live webinar event. Click here to view.

Stress, exhaustion, burnout… Do these sound familiar? If you or a family member, friend or colleague is experiencing these feelings, this interactive seminar is for you. Anana Harris Parris teaches practical self care strategies that are easily integrated into your professional or personal life. This session will include electronic reference materials and many opportunities to interact with Anana Harris Parris before, during and after the presentation.

Presenter

Anana Harris Parris is the founder and CEO of the Self Care Agency, a social enterprise promoting strategic self care programming through workshops, seminars, products and community partnerships.


Date: August 25, 2021

In Borden v. United States, 141 S. Ct. 1817 (2021), the Supreme Court held that a criminal offense that requires only a mens rea of recklessness cannot count as a "violent felony" under the Armed Career Criminal Act's (ACCA's) force clause or elements clause. ACCA enhances the sentence of anyone convicted under 18 U.S.C. SS 922(g) of being a felon in possession of a firearm if she has three or more prior convictions (whether state or federal) for a "violent felony" or a "serious drug offense," or both. The increase in penalty is severe: A 10-year maximum sentence turns into a 15-year minimum. This webinar will analyze the Borden decision and its application to the ACCA and other enhancements in pending and future cases, as well as cases that are final on direct review, e.g., post-conviction remedies. The webinar will also discuss strategies to challenge application of ACCA's force clause beyond Borden's holding.  

Presenters

Paresh Patel is currently the Appellate Chief at the Office of the Federal Public Defender for the District of Maryland. He has been at the Federal Public Defender since 2003. Before then, he worked as a staff attorney at the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C. and the Office of the Appellate Defender in New York, New York. In 1999-2000, he clerked for the Honorable Ancer L. Haggerty of the United States District Court for the District of Oregon in Portland. Paresh earned his J.D. from American University in 1996, and he received his undergraduate degree from the University of Southern California in 1993.

Erin Rust was counsel of record in United States v. Borden, 141 S. Ct. 1817 (2021), and is currently an Assistant Federal Defender serving in the Appellate Unit at Federal Defender Services of Eastern Tennessee, Inc.  She has been with Federal Defender Services since 2014 handling retroactive/post-conviction cases and district court cases in the Trial Unit before transitioning to appeals.  Previously she was in private practice.  Erin earned her J.D. from Washington University in St. Louis in 2010, and her undergraduate degree from Maryville College in 2006.