Upcoming DSO Training Events


Date: March 24, 2021

With an overwhelming percentage of clients entering pleas, this session will take a hard look at how to get the most out of deals with the government. Additionally, like it or not, many of our clients intelligently decide that cooperation is in their best interests. Unfortunately, proffer sessions can quickly devolve into train wrecks with clients getting no benefit and all the added risk we lose sleep over. This session explores common benefits and dangers associated with cooperation while addressing the many land mines just waiting for your client in the proffer room.

Presenter

Fredilyn Sison - Where hasn't Fredi worked? She's been an Assistant Federal Defender in Omaha, Nebraska; Boise, Idaho; Reno, Nevada and Asheville, North Carolina, with side stops in Washington, DC as visiting counsel at the Defender Training Branch and at the U.S. Sentencing Commission. She's in such high demand that she received a recruiting email asking her if she would like to be a legal assistant in an up and coming workers' comp firm. She wrote back thanking them but she was having too much fun being an advocate for poor people and had to decline their lovely offer. Then she killed her LinkedIn account. An honors grad of Cornell University and New York University School of Law, Fredi has served on the faculty for numerous programs around the country. Her favorite tag line during her teaching sessions is, "You understand this is interactive, right?" To date, no one has successfully slunk down low enough for her to not make eye contact. Fredi co-authored Trial in Action: The Persuasive Power of Psychodrama and expects to be an answer to a trivia question one day because of it. She's written article/chapters on various topics: child pornography, voir dire, cross examination and the effects of incarceration on families. Her two passions are psychodrama (where she's certified as a practitioner, not to be confused with being certified period) and Improv. She will play improv games all day if allowed, and you'll often hear her muttering, "Whoosh, Bang, Pow!"

Start time is 3:30 p.m. EDT (12:30 p.m. PDT)


Date: March 31, 2021

Each and every one of us representing individuals in federal court must understand sentencing. To be effective sentencing advocates, we must know our clients, our cases, and the legal framework that shapes and governs sentencing. This session focuses on the fundamentals of sentencing law, from the constitution, to the statutes, to the guidelines. Attendees will be introduced to 18 U.S.C. SS 3553 and other relevant statutes. We also will tour the guidelines manual, with an eye towards understanding its basic structure and the theories on which it operates. A solid grasp of these basics will reveal there is both room and need for creative sentencing advocacy. It takes understanding this legal framework, where it is rigid and where it bends, to effectively advocate for the best possible outcomes for our clients.

Presenters 

Jayme Feldman is an attorney with the National Sentencing Resource Counsel Project for the Federal Public and Community Defenders. Prior to joining Sentencing Resource Counsel, Jayme was an Appellate Assistant Federal Public Defender for the Western District of New York. Jayme earned her undergraduate degree from the Honors Tutorial College at Ohio University (B.S. 2007) and her law degree from the University at Buffalo Law School (J.D. 2010).

Laura Mate is Director of the National Sentencing Resource Counsel Project for the Federal Public and Community Defenders (SRC). Laura is based in Des Moines, Iowa. Before joining SRC, Laura was an Assistant Federal Public Defender in the Western District of Washington and an associate with Perkins Coie in Seattle. She received her J.D. from the University of Michigan and her B.A. from Kenyon College.

Start time is 3:30 p.m. EDT (12:30 p.m. PDT)


Date: April 07, 2021

At sentencing, every client's story matters and how we tell that story can mean the difference between success and failure. Sentencing advocacy is not simply a recitation of the client's background, criminal history, and physical or mental health. Sentencing advocacy is a credible, captivating, convincing story about our clients' lives. This session focuses on effective storytelling techniques and its integration into persuasive sentencing advocacy to unlock compassion, empathy, and mercy.

Presenter

Akin Adepoju has served as an Assistant Federal Defender in both the Trial and Capital Habeas Units for the Federal Defender Offices for the Western District of Pennsylvania and District of Delaware. He has worked on cases from pre-indictment stages to state and federal capital and non-capital trials. Akin has published scholarly articles and lectures nationally in training programs for federal and state defenders on trial and sentencing advocacy, litigating race and trauma issues, legal writing, and ethics. Before joining the Federal Defender family, Akin was an attorney at the Fair Trial Initiative, where he litigated state capital trial cases in North Carolina. Akin is a cum laude graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park, earned his J.D. cum laude from Rhode Island's Roger Williams University School of Law, where he was a Dean's Scholar and student-attorney in the Criminal Defense Clinic, and earned his LL.M. from Temple University School of Law as a Public Interest Scholar. He is the recipient of the Feinstein Public Interest Award. Akin serves as Adjunct Professor of Law at Delaware Law School, where he teaches Eighth Amendment Capital Punishment and Advanced Criminal Law courses. Akin was detailed to Defender Services Office in D.C, where he now serves as an Attorney Advisor.

Start time is 3:30 p.m. EDT (12:30 p.m. PDT)


Date: April 14, 2021

Although a rigid application of the Sentencing Guidelines is no longer mandatory under Supreme Court precedent, correctly calculating your client's guideline range is one of the most important steps in obtaining the best possible sentence for your client. In this session of Fundamentals, we will break into small groups led by skilled facilitators. Using problems from real cases, we will practice applying the main drug offense guideline, SS2D1.1, and several criminal history guidelines, SSSS4A1.1 - 4A1.2.

Enrollment for this workshop is limited to 30 participants each week. You may only register for this workshop on April 14, 2021 or on April 21, 2021 - not both dates. However, if upon registering you are waitlisted for the one week, you may try to register for the other week.

Facilitators

Akin Adepoju, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Kasha Castillo, Supervisory Attorney/Training Director, Federal Defenders Office of San Diego, Inc., San Diego, CA

Craig Crawford, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Walter Goncalves, Assistant Federal Public Defender, District of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Tracy Hayes, Assistant Federal Defender, District of Connecticut, New Haven, CT

Christian Lassiter, Assistant Federal Public Defender, District of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

Jeff Lazarus, Assistant Federal Public Defender, Northern District of Ohio, Cleveland, OH

Bunmi Lomax, Assistant Federal Public Defender, Southern District of Florida, Miami, FL

Lisa Lunt, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Nicole Lybrand, Assistant Federal Defender, Western District of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC

Richard McWilliams, Assistant Federal Defender, District of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

Joan Politeo, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Fredilyn Sison, Assistant Federal Defender, Training Coordinator & Director, Western District of North Carolina, Asheville, NC

Start time is 3:00 p.m. EDT (12:00 p.m. PDT)


Date: April 21, 2021

Although a rigid application of the Sentencing Guidelines is no longer mandatory under Supreme Court precedent, correctly calculating your client's guideline range is one of the most important steps in obtaining the best possible sentence for your client. In this session of Fundamentals, we will break into small groups led by skilled facilitators. Using problems from real cases, we will practice applying the main drug offense guideline, SS2D1.1, and several criminal history guidelines, SSSS4A1.1 - 4A1.2.

Enrollment for this workshop is limited to 30 participants each week. You may only register for this workshop on April 14, 2021 or on April 21, 2021 - not both dates. However, if upon registering you are waitlisted for the one week, you may try to register for the other week.

Facilitators

Akin Adepoju, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Kasha Castillo, Supervisory Attorney/Training Director, Federal Defenders Office of San Diego, Inc., San Diego, CA

Craig Crawford, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Walter Goncalves, Assistant Federal Public Defender, District of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Tracy Hayes, Assistant Federal Defender, District of Connecticut, New Haven, CT

Christian Lassiter, Assistant Federal Public Defender, District of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

Jeff Lazarus, Assistant Federal Public Defender, Northern District of Ohio, Cleveland, OH

Bunmi Lomax, Assistant Federal Public Defender, Southern District of Florida, Miami, FL

Lisa Lunt, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Nicole Lybrand, Assistant Federal Defender, Western District of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC

Richard McWilliams, Assistant Federal Defender, District of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

Joan Politeo, Attorney Advisor, Defender Services Office Training Division, Washington, DC

Fredilyn Sison, Assistant Federal Defender, Training Coordinator & Director, Western District of North Carolina, Asheville, NC

Start time is 3:00 p.m. EDT (12:00 p.m. PDT)